What are the symptoms of menstrual cramps?

Menstrual cramps are pains that begin in the lower abdomen and pelvis. The discomfort can extend to the lower back or legs. The cramps can be a quite painful or simply a dull ache. They can be periodic or continual. Pain also may be felt in the inner thighs, or hips.


Menstrual cramps usually begin before the onset of menstrual period, peak within 24 hours after the onset of the bleeding, and subside again after a day or two.

Menstrual cramps may be accompanied by a headache and/or nausea, which can lead, although infrequently, to the point of vomiting. Menstrual cramps can also be accompanied by either constipation or diarrhea, because the prostaglandins which cause smooth muscles to contract also affect the intestinal tract. Some women experience an urge to urinate more frequently.


How are menstrual cramps diagnosed?
The diagnosis of menstrual cramps is usually made by the woman herself and reflects her individual perception of pain. Once a woman has experienced menstrual cramps, usually with the adolescent onset of her monthly menstrual flow (menses), she becomes well aware of the typical symptoms. If there are other medical conditions contributing to menstrual cramps (secondary dysmenorrhea), the doctor may suggest diagnostic testing including imaging studies.


What is the treatment for common menstrual cramps (primary dysmenorrhea)?
Every woman needs to find a treatment that works for her. There are a number of possible remedies for menstrual cramps.
Current recommendations include not only adequate rest and sleep, but also regular exercise (especially walking). Some women find that abdominal massage, yoga, or orgasmic sexual activity may bring relief. A heating pad applied to the abdominal area may relieve the pain and congestion.
A number of nonprescription (over-the-counter) agents can help control the pain as well as actually prevent the menstrual cramps altogether. For mild cramps, aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol), or acetaminophen plus a diuretic (Diurex MPR, FEM-1, Midol, Pamprin, Premsyn, and others) may be sufficient. However, aspirin has limited effect in curbing the production of prostaglandin, and it is only useful for less painful cramps.


The main agents for treating moderate menstrual cramps are the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which lower the production of prostaglandin and lessen its effect. The NSAIDs that do not require a prescription are:
• ibuprofen (Advil, Midol IB, Motrin, Nuprin, and others);
• naproxen sodium (Aleve, Anaprox); and
• ketoprofen (Actron, Orudis KT).


A woman should start taking one of these medications before her pain becomes difficult to control. This might mean starting medication 1 to 2 days before her anticipated period is due, and then continuing taking the medication for the first one to two days of her period. The best results are obtained by taking one of the NSAIDs on a scheduled basis and not waiting for the pain to begin.


Relief your pain by Mini TENS Unit Dysmenorrhea Physiotherapy Device

Physiotherapy is a drug-free health care practice. It is of no side-effect and the research shows that not only does physiotherapy treatment benefit the patient, but it is also a cost-effective measure that can help ensure the sustainability of the health care system.

Mini TENS Unit Dysmenorrhea Physiotherapy Device will be the good helper for you to relief the dysmenorrhea pain, it functions directly on the painful part of the body, to ease your discomfort.

Mini TENS Unit Dysmenorrhea Physiotherapy Device is easy to handle with the below features:

• Single channel
• LCD display
• Digital control panel design, easy-to-operate
• 6 modes available for selection
• Palm size with belt clip, unique and delicate
• Auto shut-off function
• Treatment timer preset
• Elegance design

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